APOE Genetic Testing | Personalized Genetic Testing

APOE GENETIC TESTING
Determine Risk of Vascular Disease

Ready to get started or want to learn more? Fill out the form below.

Personalized Genetic Testing provides an invaluable service to physicians and patients throughout the U.S.

Thousands of Tests Performed

Providing doctors with the information needed to determine the best medicines and treatments for each of their patients.

20+ Years Experience

Experience in biotechnology, pharmaceutical, hematology, flow cytometry, clinical molecular biology, immunology, and chemistry industries.

Fast 5-Day Turnaround

Using the latest technologies from the leaders in the industry, our process is 3 times faster than competitor’s analysis methods.

Accurate Reporting

Through Coriell Institute, backed by over 60 years of research experience providing the quality control required for validation in pharmacogenetics testing.

PGT’s APOE Gene Testing supports doctors in determining the probable late onset of Alzheimer Disease (AD) or genetic predisposition to AD.

Apolipoprotein E

APOE lab testing has found variants of apolipoprotein E are risk factors for many different conditions. For example, APOE alleles have been shown to influence the risk of cardiovascular diseases. People who carry at least one copy of the APOE e4 allele have an increased chance of developing atherosclerosis, which is an accumulation of fatty deposits and scar-like tissue in the lining of the arteries. This progressive narrowing of the arteries increases the risk of heart attack and stroke.

The APOE e2 allele has been shown to greatly increase the risk of a rare condition called hyperlipoproteinemia type III. Most people with this disorder have two copies of the APOE e2 allele, leading researchers to conclude that the e2 allele plays a critical role in the development of the condition. Hyperlipoproteinemia type III is characterized by increased blood levels of cholesterol, certain fats called triglycerides, and molecules called beta-very low-density lipoproteins (beta-VLDLs), which carry cholesterol and lipoproteins in the bloodstream. A buildup of cholesterol and other fatty materials can lead to the formation of small, yellow skin growths called xanthomas and the development of atherosclerosis.

APOE gene variants have also been studied as a potential risk factor for age-related macular degeneration, an eye disease that is a leading cause of vision loss among older people worldwide. Some studies have suggested that having at least one copy of the APOE e4 allele may help protect against this disease or delay the onset of vision loss, while having at least one copy of the APOE e2 allele may increase the risk of this disease or cause symptoms to appear earlier. However, other studies have not found these associations. More APOE test and research is needed to clarify what role, if any, APOE gene variants play in the development of age-related macular degeneration.